Friday, December 14, 2012

Primitive Survival Cooking & Food Preparation

Found a good "Primitive Cooking & Baking Techniques" link? Let Us Know!
Improvised Grain Mill The grain mill described can efficiently pound whole-grain wheat, corn, etc., into meal and flour thereby greatly improving digestibility and avoiding the diarrhea and sore mouths that would result from eating large quantities of unground grain.

Build a Wood-burning Cookstove From a Steel Barrel Many people are familiar with wood heaters made from steel barrels. This is a description of how to make a wood cook stove from a barrel. An effort has been made to keep it simple so that you will not need special skills like welding or forging. The only tools needed are a drill, a jigsaw (with hacksaw blade), tape measure, and simple hand tools.

WOOD-BURNING OVEN by REV. BERTRAND SAUBOLLE. This oven was designed and built for use in the Godavari School in Kathmandu, Nepal. It is built of solid brick, with a sheet iron door. A wood fire is burned in the oven, the ashes removed, and the bread slipped in to bake in the heat retained by the thick brick wall. The oven for the school has a baking space of about 122cm x 122cm (4' x 4'), but some have been built with oven floors as large as 183cm x 183cm (6' x 6'). (For larger sized baking areas, of course, the size of the entire structure has to be adjusted.)

Camp/Primitive Cooking In recent times the popularity of compact camping stoves has brought outdoor cooking within the reach of many who would never have attempted it previously. The stoves are very convenient and when on you're on the trail and want something quick to eat or drink they are hard to beat. However, nothing will ever taste the same as food cooked on an open fire of your own making. Apart from purely aesthetic considerations a cooking fire is also more practical in many situations and allows a wider variety of cooking opportunities. As well as roasting and toasting over the flames or just boiling something up in your billy there are many other possible cooking methods, none of which require recourse to store bought equipment, here are a few ideas.

Stove Technology: Terms And Concepts As early as Roman times stoves made of clay, tile, or earthenware were in use in central and N Europe. Early Swiss stoves of clay or brick, without chimneys, were built against the outer house wall, with an opening to the outside through which they were fueled and through which the smoke could escape.

Building Masonry Cookstoves Also available HERE

Cooking Over an Open Fire I have cooked over a fire in a fireplace for years, here are a few things that I think are very important.

Cooking Info-Open Hearth Open hearth cooking is the oldest way of cooking. Before cook stoves came into existence, fireplaces were commonly used. A cook knew how to prepare the fire for a day of planned cooking. The cook would rise early in order to start the fire for the day's cooking. The fire was also the last thing at night the cook tended to, banking it for the next morning's use.

Open Hearth Grilled Fish There was only one way to roast a fish in the open hearth prior to the reflector oven. The cook would place a seasoned, whole fish on an oak, pecan or cedar plank. Then the plank would be placed standing upright on the side wall of the hearth. The reflective heat from the coals cooked the fish. This dish works equally well in the home fireplace.

The Art of Open-Hearth Cooking "Roast meats aren't what they used to be," says author Karen Hess. "Until just a century ago, turkeys and squabs and hams and other meats were roasted to golden-brown perfection in front of-not over—a blazing fire. Today, however, the art of roasting meat in this fashion has been almost totally forgotten."

Fireplaces That Can Heat Your Home and Cook Your Meal Any fireplace will happily cook while it heats — persuading your wood to do double duty. You can wrap sweet corn, potatoes, fresh-caught trout, and apples in tinfoil and bury it in the ash bank just as you would in a camp fire. But there's no timer or automatic thermostat to regulate a live fire for more complex recipes.

Central PA Magazine - WITF's Monthly Magazine Although a large, roaring fire in the kitchen fireplace is how you may think of open-hearth cooking, Martin says a small blaze was usually used in the early 1800s. "You regulate temperature by how much fire you have," he says, adding that embers are most common to cook on. "Embers are easier to control; they have a more uniform heat."

HOW TO COOK WITH A WOOD COOK STOVE When my companion and I began our 18-month transition period of moving to and living in the woods, we also began a period of education. We discussed and planned much. We bought books and magazines and took classes on everything from solar collecting to gardening. One subject evaded me: cooking on a wood-burning stove. Every time I saw a magazine that flashed headlines on wood stoves, my hands would tremble in anticipation as I reached for it. However, the wood stoves in question were for heating, not for cooking.

Cooking on a wood stove Cooking on a wood stove is an art and a science, but it's not hard to learn with some basic guidance.

Wood Cooking & Heating Cooking with wood stoves is pretty tricky. That was an art handed down from mother to daughter for generations! The instruction manual for my Monarch wood/electric range has about 50 pages of instructions. Regulating the temperature of a real, honest to goodness wood cooking range is hard enough: regulating the cooking surface temperature of a makeshift stove is much more difficult. Generally, the use of trivets to elevate the cooking pots and pans above the stove surface will allow more air circulation and lower the temperature, and that is easier to regulate than the temperature of the stove.

Heating and Cooking with Wood We used to cook most of our meals on an open fire but this can be a pretty inefficient way to cook so now we have built our enclosed kitchen we use on wood burning stove build from an old oil drum.. Much of the heat of an open fire is quickly lost into the atmosphere and the wind cools the food. A stove or oven provides greater control over the combustion and burns the wood more completely and is therefore potentially more efficient. However we used to burn waste cardboard from packaging on an open fire to quickly boil a kettle and it takes much longer on the stove. See also: How to make a wood burning stove

Fuel Efficient Wood Stove Research The Aprovecho Research Center has been involved with designing and testing fuel efficient wood stoves since 1976. Aprovecho initially helped to create the Lorena stove in Guatemala and published a manual teaching how to construct this high mass stove. Further testing of stoves led to the development of other stoves that were more fuel efficient.

I Live With a Cook stove and Love It The first time I baked biscuits I burned them to ebony. Also the second and third time. But on the fourth try they came out golden brown. And I burned my hands and wrists every day until I finally got it through my blockhead that EVERYTHING on or near that stove was HOT! But surely—if somewhat slowly—I mastered the wood range.

Backcountry Baking Stove-Top Style! Some chill, hungry day this winter, give this trio of north-country recipes a try, and see if they don't please your palate, warm your body, and infect your spirit with the call of the wild!

"Cooking on a Wood Cook Stove" by Karen L. Zlattner Although my husband and I are not off the grid, we don't want to rely on public utilities if we don't have to. So, even though we have an all-electric kitchen we decided to add a wood cook stove

Haybox Cooking. Haybox cooking, or retained-heat cooking, is an age-old slow cooking method used to conserve energy, both in fuel and labor. Working off thermodynamic principles, food is brought to a boil, simmered for a few minutes then put into a well insulated box where it will continue to cook slowly for hours. Since the insulated haybox cooker prevents most of the heat in the food from escaping into the surrounding environment, no additional energy is needed to complete the cooking process. While cooking time takes about twice as long as stovetop cooking, haybox cooking can save between 20% and 80% of the energy normally needed. Your pot only needs to remain on the stove for a quarter of the time needed in conventional cooking. Haybox cooking also prevents food from boiling over, overcooking, sticking to the bottom or burning. Food turns out perfectly cooked every time.

Building an Horno: the Adobe Bread Oven by Michael Moquin - Detailed adobe instructions.

Greg's Earth Oven Good adobe oven building instructions with illustrations.

Backyard Bakeoven Workshop with Norbert Senf step-by-step construction photos of a 32" X 36" oven.

BlackOven Good site by a brick oven enthusiast, including recipes and baking info.

Castable Oven step-by-step construction photos of a refractory concrete oven.

Wood Burning Oven Website, including oven plans, pizza instructions, and more.

Cob Oven - An Experiment in Progress Interesting oven experiments, including a novel firing technique

Building Heather's Oven - construction sequence of an Alan Scott style 4' X 6' oven.

1930's - 1950's Finnish Commercial - This double deck design was presented at the 1997 MHA meeting by Heikki Hyytiainen and is from a 1951 book from Finland.

Seven secrets of Dutch Oven cooking Squatting heavily in dank basements, drafty attics, and dusty, cluttered garages, these three-legged hulks from a bygone era wait impatiently to release their treasures. Until then, they are pitted by time and tarnished by neglect. For those who will uncover the mystery, their gaping caverns can once again be brimming with magic.

Making and using a solar cooker Solar cooking is a delightful alternative to conventional cooking methods. The solar cookers available today really work and they deserve serious evaluation by a much larger audience. For 40 years, small groups of people have been using and refining some very good designs. But these designs have, for the most part, gone unnoticed even by those involved with alternative energy. With such a lack of support, you’d think they would have vanished from view long ago. But they haven’t.

Fireplace cooking cures the winter blues Several years ago we experienced a prolonged winter storm that left power lines down and thousands of people without heat, hot water, and operative cookstoves. And for the better part of the week they learned to live a little like the pioneers of old...

Cooking Over an Open Fire How to not lose your eyebrows!

Cooking With a Dutch Oven Yes, you can cook just about ANYTHING with it..

How to Cook With a Wood Cook Stove From an experienced cook stove user.

The Solar Cooking Archive. Info & plans for 11 different types of solar cookers. Fairly decent graphics and text. Great selection.

Hot-Rock Cooking Party. Excellent & interesting article from the Smithsonian Magazine.

Building a Brick Pizza Oven. Limited details, but interesting enough. Good photos fill in some of the blanks.

Cooking Fireplace and Bread Oven @ Rumford Fireplace
Cooking Fireplace Plan
Superior Clay Bake Ovens
Picture circa 1760 reproduction fireplace & oven
Picture of circa 1720 Bucks County, PA oven

Solar Cooking Page. Plans, pics and testimonials. Some links to other places, too, which are probably duplicates to others on RMSG.

"Oven Building" Very interesting article on building and using a Viking era oven. Primitive, but useable. By Mark Beadle.

Solar Cooking Documents About 6 months worth of reading in one handy location.

Design Principles for Wood Burning Cook Stoves [40pg PDF] Although open fires are often used wastefully, carefully operated open fires can be fuel efficient and clean burning when tested in the lab. In many situations, cooks are not overly concerned with fuel use, and studies have shown that when fuel is plentiful three-stone fires can use an excessive amount of wood to cook a small amount of food. But in other places where fuel is scarce, open fires can be carefully controlled so that fuel efficiency rivals many first generation improved cook stoves.

How To Use Wood Stoves (and use them safely!) Part Two In MOTHER NO. 48, we printed—at some length—Ole's advice on the general use (with an emphasis on safety) of wood stoves. The following excerpts from Ole's new book—which may be the only one ever published on the design and construction of wood-burning stoves—will give you a further example of the thoroughness and precision with which Ole Wik puts his ideas across. Read on and learn ... and remember: There's much more wood stove wisdom where this came from!

Cookstoves for the Developing World Half the World's population of nearly six billion people prepare their food and heat their homes with coal and the traditional biomass fuels of dung, crop residues, wood and charcoal. The procurement and consumption of these fuels define the character of everyday life in many developing countries.

The Art of the Wood Cookstove These old-fashioned stoves still attract a loyal following, and it’s easy to understand why. Cookstoves combine stove-top cooking, baking, water heating and home heating, all in a single appliance that is steeped in tradition and powered by a readily available, renewable fuel. As with so many combination devices, cookstoves perform each function with varying degrees of competence, but if the following owners and users of antique and new wood cookstoves are any guide, the problems that do arise are easily overlooked. These folks are smitten.

NASD: Cooking When the Power Goes Off after a Disaster After a storm has knocked out electricity or gas lines, cooking meals can be a problem and can be hazardous if a few basic rules are not followed. See also: SURVIVAL ESSENTIALS - COOKING METHODS

Haybox how to and description | Lost Valley Haybox cooking (also called retained-heat cooking) is an age-old method that can be used to conserve energy not only during times of crisis, but anytime. Depending on the food item and amount cooked, the use of a haybox or insulated cooker saves between 20% and 80% of the energy normally needed to cook a food. The longer an item usually takes on a stovetop, the more fuel is saved. For example, with a haybox, five pots of long-cooking dry beans will use the same amount of fuel to cook to completion as just one pot cooked without a haybox.

An Improved Stove Can Change Your Life / Radio Scripts / DCFRN a couple of articles on 3rd world cooking.

Hayboxes: Haybox cooking (also called retained-heat cooking) is an age-old method that can be used to conserve energy not only during times of crisis, but anytime. Depending on the food item and amount cooked, the use of a haybox or insulated cooker saves between 20% and 80% of the energy normally needed to cook a food. The longer an item usually takes on a stovetop, the more fuel is saved. For example, with a haybox, five pots of long-cooking dry beans will use the same amount of fuel to cook to completion as just one pot cooked without a haybox.

How to start and maintain a wood fire The knowledge and skills needed to operate a wood burning system effectively need to be learned and practiced to get them right. Although it is not brain surgery or rocket science, it is not as simple as it might first appear. So, when you can light a fire with a single match and get a hot, bright fire burning in just a few minutes, you've accomplished something worth knowing and we salute the time and care you've taken. Reach around and pat yourself on the back.

Settler's pickle for hams, cheeks, and shoulders This page has a bunch of old time Canadian Settler's Guide (written in 1855) recipes for various items.

Stoves Archive for January 2002 This is an archive of messages from a discussion group.

Solar Cookers & Solar Cookers & Solar Cookers II & Solar Cooker III - a series of FAO pamphlets & manuals. See also: Cook Stove & Fuel-saving Stoves & Fuel-saving Cook stoves & Biomass Stoves & Wood Stoves & Wood Stove Testing & Cookers & Improved Stoves & Stove Portable & Sawdust Stove Build a wood-burning cookstove from a steel barrel. Author: Countryside Publications Ltd.; Buy New: $5.95

The joys of the wood cookstove. Author: Countryside Publications Ltd.; Buy New: $5.95
Space heating, water heating and cooking: Of course, we've always heated this house with wood, but I wanted to extend the use of wood to the heating of water and cooking of food in order to cut our household use of fossil fuels even further. Unfortunately there are no clean burning (EPA certified), full-sized wood stoves that have a bake oven and water heating option. The EPA exempted cook stoves back in the 1980s when they designed their wood smoke regulation. The result of that decision is obvious today: want a clean cook stove that will also heat your house and water? Sorry, you're out of luck. Space heating, water heating and cooking: Of course, we've always heated this house with wood, but I wanted to extend the use of wood to the heating of water and cooking of food in order to cut our household use of fossil fuels even further. Unfortunately there are no clean burning (EPA certified), full-sized wood stoves that have a bake oven and water heating option. The EPA exempted cook stoves back in the 1980s when they designed their wood smoke regulation. The result of that decision is obvious today: want a clean cook stove that will also heat your house and water? Sorry, you're out of luck.





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